Category Archives: Tutorials

DIY Glittered Found Feather Art

DIY Glittered Found Feather Art from Farmhouse38.comSooooooo, I’m a feather hoarder. I suppose this may be a side effect of chicken keeping. Every morning when I go to let the girls out, I collect whatever good-looking feathers I find sitting on the ground. When it’s molt season, good lawd, I come out of the chicken garden with a ton of feathers. And if you’re wondering where those smart little red feathers came from? I also collect the feathers that my African Grey, Nixie, drops from her saucy red tail. Yes, it has come to this.

DIY Glittered Found Feather Art from Farmhouse38.com

Oh, the feathers that come off those fluffy butts.

DIY Glittered Found Feather Art from Farmhouse38.com

Nix says: Whaddup. No seriously. She says that. She won’t shut up.

Framing feathers is nothing new, let’s be honest. But the chickens are forcing my hand. Look at all these suckers!

DIY Glittered Found Feather Art from Farmhouse38.com

So many feathers, so little time.

So, unholster your glitter and let the crafting commence!

I found this great ‘Norrlida‘ frame at Ikea and knew immediately when I saw it that it was the one. It’s an interesting size and shape (approx. 12″ x 28.5″), and comes with a beautiful matte insert that is white on one side, black on the other. Outstanding for framing up a collection.

DIY Glittered Found Feather Art from Farmhouse38.com

 

I then assembled my troops across a sheet of wax paper.

DIY Glittered Found Feather Art from Farmhouse38.com

Four of each color feather, and a fine assortment of color-coordinating glitters.

To adhere the glitter, I decided to use metal leaf adhesive (the kind you use for adhering gold leaf, like this), because it is a very watery glue that you apply with a brush and then let dry completely before applying your glitter (or metal leaf, if that’s your bag, baby). It becomes tacky when it’s dry. I like tacky. Using a heavier wet-applied glue, such as Modge-Podge would probably also work, but the thicker the adhesive, the more likely it’s gonna manipulate the feather out of it’s natural feather shape as you apply it. No bueno. If using Modge-Podge or Elmer’s Glue or something like that, I’d water it down a bit so it flows a little easier.

Carefully paint the top quarter to third of your feather with the adhesive:

DIY Glittered Found Feather Art from Farmhouse38.com

It doesn’t have to be perfect, just some version of a straight line. The glitter will blur the line a bit anyway.

If you’ve applied your adhesive and the feather went a little wonky, I’ve got a trick to fix it. Take a piece of clear Scotch tape and apply it to the back of the feather, then trim around the shape of the feather as you’d like it to be.

DIY Glittered Found Feather Art from Farmhouse38.com

There is nothing more frustrating than a wonky feather.

DIY Glittered Found Feather Art from Farmhouse38.com

Once you’ve applied your glitter, there is not a single trace of wonkiness. Magic.

Once you’ve applied your glitter, make sure to give those feathers the good ol’ tap and shake and get off all the excess glitter. Use a small, clean, dry paintbrush to dust away any errant glitter along the ‘glitter line’ to make the line as tidy as possible.

At this point, I prefer to give my glittered feathers a light spray of clear coat to keep the glitter in place. You don’t have to do this. The clear coat keeps the glitter in place, but it also slightly dumbs down the sparkle. But if you don’t clear coat, you may find that the glitter will shed a bit inside your frame. You kind of have to pick your poison.

Once everything is glittered, and coated, and dry, arrange your feathers as you want them on the matte and warm up your glue gun. Attach each with a small dot of glue applied to the backside of the feather shaft and then push the feather flat against the board as it dries to flatten it out.

Reassemble your frame and find yourself somewhere pretty to hang it.

DIY Glittered Found Feather Art from Farmhouse38.com

Glittery, feathery goodness.

 

 

Grilled Honey Peaches with Mascarpone and Pecans

Grilled Honey Peaches with Mascarpone and Pecans by Farmhouse38.comOh, this is just so damned yummy. I really wasn’t expecting it to be, to be totally honest. I look at this and it almost seems too…I don’t know…healthy? For a dessert? Maybe it’s just me. Probably just me. LOL.

So yeah, these really blew me away.

For two servings:

–2 ripe, but firm peaches, halved, pits removed

–4 oz mascarpone cheese

–1/4 cup candied pecans, processed into fine bits

–2 tablespoons warmed coconut oil

–Approx. 2 tablespoons or so of local, organic honey to drizzle

–1/4 cup candied pecans, slightly crumbled

Start by pulverizing your first quarter cup of candied pecans in the food processor, then mix them thoroughly with your mascarpone.

Next, heat your grill (or in my case, your grill skillet) to medium high. Brush or dip the flat side of your peach halves in warmed coconut oil, and drop them, face down, on the skillet or grill when it is heated up. Leave them to cook for about 4 minutes each. They’ll become really fragrant and soft when they are ready (and there will be some lovely grill marks).

Scoop your peach halves off the grill and place them face up on a plate (I recommend two halves as a serving, despite what my photos show). Scoop a generous tablespoon full of mascarpone/pecan mix onto the center of each peach, drizzle with honey, sprinkle with crushed candied pecans and serve immediately.

Grilled Honey Peaches with Mascarpone and Pecans by Farmhouse38.com

Joy.

Grilled Honey Peaches with Mascarpone and Pecans by Farmhouse38.com

Joy.

Grilled Honey Peaches with Mascarpone and Pecans by Farmhouse38.com

Joy.

By the way…this was the first time I’ve ever made a dessert for this blog and actually eaten the whole darned thing. I made four servings (in order to have enough in case I plated them wrong or some such blog nonsense) AND I ATE THEM ALL. Usually I will make something like this during the day and then save it for the Texan. But this one…you kind of have to eat it right away. I didn’t want it to go to waste. He was not impressed with this when I told him over the phone.

 

 

A Colorful New Book for Your Garden Library

Review of A Garden To Dye For by Farmhouse38.com

Gardens are just divine, aren’t they? They provide us with impossibly much: food, medicine, an eye-ball-ful of gorgeous, and a basic, peaceful connection to the Earth that is hard to put into words. Leave it to the fabulously funny Chris McLaughlin to give us just one more bit of lovely we can reap from our gardens: natural dyes.

This book is an absolute technicolor dream for the home fiber artist; all you crafty spinners with your adorable goats and sheep and bunnies and alpacas and all their glorious fluff–here is your guide for what to grow in your garden (besides fluffy animals) and how to process it into yummy, yummy homemade colors. I can only imagine the possibilities. But for those of you who aren’t quite to the point of harvesting your own fiber (uhh, that would be me), Chris shows us how and with what to dye yarns, threads, silks, cottons, linens, and other ready-to-go fabrics. But it all goes far beyond fabric; natural dyes can be used on wood, basket-making reeds, paper products, play dough, and since we’ve just come off of Easter–eggs…of course, you can dye eggs with them! Huzzah!

There are so many wonderful recipes and tricks of the trade in this book, but, as a painter, one in particular jumped out at me…making your own watercolor dye paints. I knew I had to try this. I also knew I wanted to use materials that I either had on hand, or had in the garden. Red cabbage, beets, turmeric, and black tea were all already in my kitchen and would give me blue, red/pink, yellow, and brown dyes, so I got to work. In retrospect, I also realized that I have swamp mallow, marigolds, hollyhock, rose, and coreopsis growing in the garden–all dye materials listed by Chris–but I had ants in my pants and overlooked these at the time. Dang it. DANG IT.

As with all natural dyes, a little experimentation was in order. Ultimately, I landed on a pretty decent recipe that was just a miniature version of what Chris outlines for dyeing a big batch of fabric.

To get blue dye paint, you’ll need:

-4 tablespoons of finely chopped red cabbage

-1 cup of boiling water

(I actually started out by putting the cabbage bits in a mason jar, boiling water in a tea kettle, and then pouring the boiling water over the bits and letting them sit for awhile). This color was pretty, but ultimately, I didn’t think it was strong enough, so I then transferred the contents of the jar to a small saucepan, and boiled the liquid down by half. This gave me a great blue color.

To get red/magenta/pink:

-4 tablespoons of finely chopped red beets

-1 cup of boiling water

The tea kettle method worked great for this and I did not need to boil the liquid down further. This yields a very saturated dark pink. Obviously, if you want it lighter, pull a small amount and mix with water to water it down to your desired color.

To get yellow:

–4 teaspoons of powdered turmeric

–2 cups boiling water

The tea kettle method actually yielded a nice, light yellow color, but ultimately, I wanted it more saturated so, again, I boiled the liquid down by half after the fact.

To get brown:

-6 standard black tea bags

-2 cups boiling water

The tea kettle method yielded a very light brown, which was great, but I wound up boiling this liquid down by half, as well, which gave me better saturation.

To get green:

Mix equal parts turmeric and cabbage dyes.

To get reddish-orange:

Mix equal parts turmeric and beet dyes.

To get reddish-brown:

I kind of mixed equal parts of all four base colors.

Obviously, one can mix any variation of these colors and get all different shades and colors. Experimentation is key! Chris also suggests using binders to help the color stick: these include whole milk, egg yolks, or egg whites (but each of these will change the colors slightly, so test first). I opted to not go with any binders, and so theoretically, my colors will fade slowly over time.

 

DIY All-natural Watercolor Dye Paints from A Garden to Dye For via Farmhouse38.com

My resulting colors.

And my subsequent watercolor painting:

DIY Natural Watercolor Dye Paints from A Garden to Dye For via Farmhouse38.com

Eloise and Gertie in all their all-natural colorful glory. All natural except for the Sharpie outline. I’m a cheater. I do what I want!!!

This book was just a pleasure to read–Chris’ trademark humor and gift for ‘telling it like it is’ get me every time. Be sure to visit A Garden to Dye For’s Facebook page and Chris’ blog Home Ag with a Suburban Farmer because to celebrate the launch Chris is giving away a Natural Dye Starter Kit with all sorts of goodies (including a copy of the book) to get you started on your home-dyeing and gardening adventures. To enter, you just need to follow her on Pinterest and leave a comment on the A Garden to Dye For Facebook page telling her what your favorite kind of garden is. On May 20, 2014, her Chiweenie helper will select a winner at random. You gotta love that. And if you don’t win the prize package, never fear, A Garden to Dye For is available at all major booksellers including Amazon.

Cheers to pretty colors!

Review of A Garden to Dye For via Farmhouse38.com

 

 

DIY Tillandsia Wreath

DIY Tillandsia Wreath by Farmhouse38

Oh, how I love tillandsias! After making off with a boatload of them from my recent trip to Reno (thanks again, Sierra Water Gardens!), I knew immediately that I wanted to make a wreath with some of them.

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

You will need: raffia-covered craft wire, a length of craft store grapevine, thin craft wire, and a selection of your finest mosses and air plants. Oh, and scissors and a hot glue gun. And hot glue. And a little bit of patience.

It would be very easy to start with a craft store grapevine wreath. Very easy, indeed. But I feel like I have used too many of those lately–and I was thinking I wanted something a little less chunky. So I decided to build a more slender wreath form, using raffia-covered craft wire and a length of store-bought grapevine.

I began by measuring out three lengths of raffia wire (I measured approximately 54″ lengths, which by the time you twist and bend and shape, etc., gives you approximately a 17-18″ wreath form). Twist these together into a single piece, twist the ends together, and bend and shape the wire to create a circle. (The more lengths of wire you twist together, the sturdier the form will be–go ahead, do four, five–get crazy).

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

It doesn’t have to be a perfect circle. Let’s be honest here; it probably won’t be.

Next, cut a length of grapevine to fit exactly on the form of the wreath.

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

Lay the grapevine cord along the wire form and cut it so that it fits perfectly on the form.

Every so often along the length of the grapevine, you will find little bits of wire lashing it together. One by one, undo these, and lash them back around the grapevine and the raffia wire to secure the whole thing.

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

Now we are ready to start attaching some air plants! There are a couple of ways of doing this: fishing line, thin wire, or non-toxic glue. I prefer (and happened to have on hand) wire. You want to carefully thread the wire (or fishing line works, too) through some of the base leaves the plant and then twist (not too tight, just enough to be secure).

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

For the larger plants, you may need to slip a wire around the base, as well as another towards the top of the plant. They can be heavy.

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

The smaller plants are fine just having one wire threaded through the base.

Now place the plant where you’d like it, wrapping the wire around the backside of the wreath form and twisting to secure. I also like to put a dab of hot glue on this back twist (being VERY careful not to get any on the plant itself), just to give it a little extra hold. Try to attach your plants so that they hang horizontally, as this is how they would attach themselves in nature, and this will help prevent water from collecting in their armpits (where the leaves join the plant–I’m so scientific), which is not good for them. If you must attach them so they sit upright (which a few of mine are), you may need to lay the wreath flat when you mist  or rinse the plants (this is how you should water them).

Add plants to your heart’s content! When you are happy with the arrangement, tuck some bits of moss in and around, securing with a bit of hot glue when necessary (again, being SO careful not to get it on the tillandsias).

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

Honestly? This looks pretty dang good. I almost stopped here. Almost.

For some reason, I had it in my head that I wanted a couple of tiny floating air plants in this thing. So I selected some small specimens, threaded them with wire, and then attached them to the top of the wreath (twisting and securing with hot glue there). I then applied bits of sheet moss at random to the rest of the naked wreath using plenty of hot glue (also covering the spot where the hanging plants’ wires attached to the top of the wreath).

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

Ta-dah!!!

Hang your wreath in a protected area with bright, indirect sunlight, and be sure to water regularly by misting or running under water, depending on climate and plant type. For a great article on how to care for your tillandsias, check out this post on FloraGrubb.com.

Coffee Filter Peonies

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.comCoffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Making flowers out of coffee filters or tissue is nothing new, but I’ve been meaning to try my hand at it for quite sometime. And when I say ‘try my hand’, I mean ‘try my hand':

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Wear gloves. Learn from my mistakes.

Of all the hundreds of tutorials out there on this, I landed on the one from Rebecca at The Crafted Sparrow. I liked this one. So I did it. :-) Honestly, she does a really bang-up job of laying out the tutorial, so I highly recommend you head over and follow her instructions–but I will muddle through mine just the same! Because I am a professional muddler.

I began with pretty simple supplies: scissors, large white coffee filters, thin craft wire, floral tape, hot glue, and whatever color food coloring you are looking to do. I wanted RED. Super-saturated red. We’ll get to that later.

Supplies for making Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Simple enough!

Now settle in for some busywork…depending on how many flowers you want to make, there is quite a bit of coffee-filter cutting to be done. I obviously wanted a lot of flowers, so I kind of hunkered down a few nights in a row and cut filters while watching a lot of reality TV. It helps. I promise.

You’ll want to fold a single coffee filter in half, then in fourths, then again into eighths and cut the top of it into an arch (in order to make a scalloped edge). I even folded some to just fourths, and some as much as into sixteenths, because I wanted the ruffles of the flowers to be inconsistent (which feels more real to me).

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

For the center of every flower, I wanted some fringe, so I folded the coffee filters into eighths and then instead of just scalloping the top, I actually cut them down in length by about a quarter, and scalloped the edge. Then I cut the edge so that it had fringe.

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Magic! I suddenly have a manicure.

A typical flower is going to be assembled from various pieces of these different-shaped filters–you can use any combination or repetition of any of the scalloped-edged pieces, with one fringe piece in the center.

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

A typical blossom is made up of about four pieces, but to make larger ones, sometimes I would use up to six, and to make smaller ones, sometimes I would only use one scalloped-edge piece and one center piece. There is no right or wrong amount here, and I strongly encourage you to make them various sizes–much more realistic-looking that way!

Now, take a small length of wire for your stem. Rebecca at The Crafted Sparrow suggested taking a pencil or a paintbrush or something of the sort and wrapping one end of the wire around this a few times to make a small circle as a sort of catch for the wire to not pull all the way through the coffee filters. I did this. Great idea. So once you have your wire loop, slide a fringed coffee filter piece on up the wire and mush it into a flower shape (again, look at the Rebecca’s tutorial, she did a better job of documenting this with the camera). I adhered it with a dot of hot glue. Then slide a scalloped coffee filter of your choosing up next. Mold it into a flower shape and adhere it with hot glue. Keep building until your flower makes you happy. If you want, at the end, you can wrap floral tape around the bottom to give it a finished look.

Now for the fun part…dyeing them! To get your desired color, you’re gonna have to mess around a little bit with your food coloring. Mix a few drops of food coloring with water in a bowl and test it out on your extra coffee filters. I wanted my flowers to be all varying shades of red, and so, to be honest, I hardly had any water mixed with mine at all–nearly straight food coloring. For some of them, I even added black food coloring to get that black-red color.

Coffee Filter Peonies from Farmhouse38.com

I recommend making several bowls full of varying shades of the same color, as this gives you a really realistic color scheme (flowers are gonna vary in color slightly from one to the next, right??). So play around with it! And…again…wear gloves.

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

I dipped my blooms fully into the mixture, making sure that every bit was soaked up with liquid. Then I set them, face down, on a tinfoil-lined cookie sheet to dry. Once dry, I went through and fluffed them up into the proper shape.

I went around and around with what I actually wanted to use these for–my intention was to make a Valentine’s Day centerpiece using up-cycled tin cans as vases. Long story short, I wasn’t super pleased with how it turned out:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Not the worst thing I’ve ever made, so I figured I’d share the photos anyways. Happy Valentine’s Day a week late!! LOL.

It was at this point that I realized what I really wanted out of these things was a big, lush centerpiece arrangement. So I dug out my big silver basin, and taped the top off into a grid (this is a great florist’s trick that helps support a mass of flowers-live or paper- in a wide-mouthed vessel. I used Scotch tape, which works fine, but clear floral tape works even better if you can get it because it is narrower, clearer, and has a stronger bond).

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Make sure your vessel is completely dry when you apply the tape. I dried it off, but just before I took this photo, my sparkling water bottle exploded everywhere. Perfect.

Be sure to run a length of tape around the circumference of the vessel to pin down the grid tape edges:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

It ain’t too purty but it keeps things secure and theoretically will be covered by the lushness of your arrangement.

I started by inserting a bunch of branches:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Next, I realized that the flimsy wire I made my peonies with was too flimsy, so I hot-glued each blossom to a piece of stiff, raffia-covered craft wire. Then I proceeded to shove them in amongst the branches.

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Once you’ve got quite a few flowers in there, add a few more branches, and then keep adding flowers until the thing is overflowing.

I even hot-glued a couple of smaller blossoms to some of the branches for a little more drama:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.comCoffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

So as much as this was supposed to be a Valentine’s Day project, I bumbled it enough that it didn’t quite turn out to be that. But that’s just between you and me.

Happy Valentine’s Day next year!!!

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs (and a Bee Sting)

DIY Flower Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Today’s looking up for Phoebe.  Yesterday wasn’t so fun:

Bee Stung Puppyface from Farmhouse38.com

This is what it looks like when you take a bee stinger to the mouth.

Bee stung puppyface from Farmhouse38.com

Needless to say, poor puppyface was in a lot of pain, and had to go to the vet for a shot. Sad face.

But today, her face has returned to it’s normal level of goofy, and she is feeling quite fantastic. So we decided to celebrate with a puppy flower collar.

DIY Flower Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Who’s a pretty girl?!

This tutorial harkens back to my floral design days when we’d do floral collars for dogs who got to be in the wedding party (which is pretty much my favorite thing ever). They’re so simple to make, and as long as you have a tolerant dog, they’re pretty easy to wear (I should note here that not all dogs will be a fan of this, so proceed with caution.  Also, be sure to select flowers that are non-toxic–I cannot stress this enough. Roses, marigolds, daisies, snapdragons, small sunflowers, coneflowers, etc. are all choices that are non-toxic and also hold up well in this sort of application-ie, won’t get too floppy too soon. Also herbs–herbs are great for this).

Start off by measuring your pet’s neck, and then add about two inches to that measurement. Now cut that amount of thin craft wire, and twist a small loop at one end:

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Select your flowers and cut them right at the top of the stem so that the blossom has zero stem.

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

No stem!!

Now, carefully poke the wire through the base of the bud and out the other side. Sometimes it’s helpful to use a pin to sort of ‘pre-drill’ through the flower before poking the wire through.

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

DIY Floral Collar from Farmhouse38.com

Slide that wire on through.

Slide the blossom on down, and repeat until you have filled the length with about an inch to spare.

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Now, place the collar on your victim and feed the loose wire end through the looped wire end and secure.

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Oh, Phoebe…workin’ that collar!

I should also note that an optional and very pretty way to attach the collar is to start with a slightly shorter wire length, put a wire loop at each end of the wire, and then attach short lengths of ribbon to each end.  These can then easily be tied together to secure around your pet’s neck:

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Willie shows off this version.

This was, incidentally, the method I used to make Millie’s pretty little necklace last spring (some of you might remember):

DIY Floral Collars from Farmhouse38.com

I should note here that Miss Millie was not a fan of her necklace AT ALL. I do not recommend putting accessories on your chickens unless they are just really used to these sorts of shenanigans or are really just that fashionable.

But the Feebster didn’t seem to mind her collar too much. She knows it goes well with her non-swollen face.

DIY Floral Collars for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Candy Stripe Monogram

Candy Stripe Monogram from Farmhouse38

I truly feel that the paper straw is a highly underrated crafting material. As a functional straw, I kind of think they suck (see what I did there?!). There’s just something that I don’t like about drinking through paper. Kind of right up there with disposable wooden ice cream spoons. Blech. It might just be me. Nonetheless, they are cute as heck, am I right?

Quite some time ago I got this 20″ tall wooden R. I wish I could tell you why.

Candy Stripe Monogram from Farmhouse38

A mighty fine letter.

I just decided I needed it. And clearly I did, because it has been sitting around collecting cobwebs for a very long time. Until a couple of days ago when I decided to glue straws all over it.

Obviously, there are a plethora of fairly inexpensive craft store letters that could be used here (see here for an example). In fact, one could even cut a letter out of flat cardboard and achieve this same look without paying a dime. But I had a big wooden R that was calling my name.  I can’t quite remember, but I think I got it from here.  My paper straws came from Amazon.

I simply measured and cut the straws to fit, lining their patterns up and hot-gluing them one at a time. I decided that I wanted to have wide, alternating stripes of two differently-laid patterns, so I measured out five, four inch tall sections.

Candy Stripe Monogram from Farmhouse38

Measuring out my horizontal stripes with expert-level precision.

The sections would contrast between having the stripe pattern line up, and having it not line up (incidentally, I learned that the patterns on these straws are not uniform, therefore, it was nearly impossible to have them line up properly. Duly noted).

Candy Stripe Monogram from Farmhouse38

Ah, the chaos of crafting.

When every straw had been singularly glued in place, I then simply glued ribbon around the perimeter of the letter to hide the bare edges (as well as the open, not-so-pretty ends of the straws).

Candy Stripe Monogram from Farmhouse38

The ribbon is an easy, tailored finish for what were fairly gruesome edges.

Candy Stripe Monogram from Farmhouse38

A close up of the alternating patterns.  And of the way they really don’t line up very well.  But eh…good enough.

Candy Stripe Monogram from Farmhouse38

The R looks great hanging over our off-center temporary range. I may just leave it up until we get ourselves a grown-up range and hood.

The kitchen is starting to look rather Christmassy. I heart it.

Christmas Kitchen Decor from Farmhouse38

Miniature rosemary wreaths are a quick, adorable holiday accent, straight from the garden.

Christmas Kitchen Holiday Decor from Farmhouse38

More kitchen holiday cheer.

Candy Stripe Monogram (using paper straws) from Farmhouse38

Yep. I think I may just leave it all year round.

 

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