Monthly Archives: February 2014

Meet The Farmstead…and a Giveaway!

***We have a winner!! Congrats to Brenna W.!! ***

And thank you to all who entered…remember that you can pick up a print of your very own at The Farmstead’s Etsy shop.***Meet The Farmstead and a Giveaway from Farmhouse38.com

Hands down, one of my favorite spots amongst the interwebs: this wacky, wonderful thing that is The Farmstead. I cannot get enough of the whimsical images that they churn out (please, please go follow them on Facebook so that you can fully appreciate…go right now! I’ll wait here.) depicting life on their small and lovely and simply magical farm in Olympia, Washington.

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

“Let Them Eat Cake”. Lol.

'Date Night' by the Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

Image by The Farmstead-OlyFarmstead.org

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

I agree. Completely.

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

Meet Nick and Rachael: Mr. & Mrs. Farmstead, wearers of many hats. Pig-herders, chicken-wranglers, goat-whisperers, barn-raisers, documentary photographers; they do it all, just the two of them.

Well, they get a little help from baby daughter, ‘Gizmo’.

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

Gizmo and Kitchen Pig.

They’re in good company with their motley crew of free-ranging Tamworth pigs, Katahdin Hair Sheep, and an assorted collection of goats, chickens, donkeys, dogs, and cats.

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

Lest these lovely images lead you to believe that The Farmstead is all brains and beauty but no brawn; rest assured, this is a real, working farm. Their heritage breed pigs provide pastured pork to the local masses, as do their lovely grass-fed lambs, and their laying hens are hand-raised and loved on to become sweet-natured flock members for backyard chicken enthusiasts. All their animals happily free-range and forage under the canopy of the forest, living the good life, working their best angles for the camera.

But Rachael and Nick say it best on their website: We are committed to creating an environment that sustains our presence without sacrificing the land. In Europe the term “High Farming” is used to reference the perfect balance between plants and animals. Animals enrich the soil, the soil produces plants, the plants feed the animals. On The Farmstead we aspire to succeed at “High Farming” and, in turn, nourish the people.

Our farm has made the conscious decision to raise animals with respect and dignity. We believe by giving animals a free and protected environment they will grow happy and healthy, without the constant bevy of antibiotics, hormones, and fillers, factory farms are forced to use. We also believe when animals are raised in fresh air and sunshine (or in our case, rainshine) their meat and eggs are healthier for us.

Cheers to that.

Their stunning photography demonstrates just how much they love their animals (and visa versa), as well as showing off the couple’s quick, quirky sense of humor.

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

Which brings me to my favorite The Farmstead image ever…The Winged Goat:

The Winged Goat by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

I gushed over this image when it came through my feed on Facebook. An embarrassing amount. So imagine my delight and surprise when a print showed up in my mailbox. My real mailbox. Where mail goes. A real print of my very own–to hang on my gallery wall:

The Winged Goat by The Farmstead olyfarmstead.org via Farmhouse38.com

See? There it is! Prime position.

Rachael and Nick. They’re just good people.

I’m completely excited and humbled that, together, we are giving away a framed copy of The Winged Goat to one lucky winner. To enter, just follow the link below and leave us a comment telling us where you’d hang this print. Contest runs today February 28th, 2014, thru midnight Tuesday, March 4th, 2014. We’ll announce the winner on Wednesday! Good luck!

Enter here: Meet The Farmstead Giveaway

And don’t miss out on all The Farmstead fun–follow along with Rachael, Nick, and Gizmo on their farming adventures at OlyFarmstead.orgFacebookInstagram, and Pinterest.

Image by The Farmstead- OlyFarmstead.org

DIY Tillandsia Wreath

DIY Tillandsia Wreath by Farmhouse38

Oh, how I love tillandsias! After making off with a boatload of them from my recent trip to Reno (thanks again, Sierra Water Gardens!), I knew immediately that I wanted to make a wreath with some of them.

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

You will need: raffia-covered craft wire, a length of craft store grapevine, thin craft wire, and a selection of your finest mosses and air plants. Oh, and scissors and a hot glue gun. And hot glue. And a little bit of patience.

It would be very easy to start with a craft store grapevine wreath. Very easy, indeed. But I feel like I have used too many of those lately–and I was thinking I wanted something a little less chunky. So I decided to build a more slender wreath form, using raffia-covered craft wire and a length of store-bought grapevine.

I began by measuring out three lengths of raffia wire (I measured approximately 54″ lengths, which by the time you twist and bend and shape, etc., gives you approximately a 17-18″ wreath form). Twist these together into a single piece, twist the ends together, and bend and shape the wire to create a circle. (The more lengths of wire you twist together, the sturdier the form will be–go ahead, do four, five–get crazy).

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

It doesn’t have to be a perfect circle. Let’s be honest here; it probably won’t be.

Next, cut a length of grapevine to fit exactly on the form of the wreath.

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

Lay the grapevine cord along the wire form and cut it so that it fits perfectly on the form.

Every so often along the length of the grapevine, you will find little bits of wire lashing it together. One by one, undo these, and lash them back around the grapevine and the raffia wire to secure the whole thing.

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

Now we are ready to start attaching some air plants! There are a couple of ways of doing this: fishing line, thin wire, or non-toxic glue. I prefer (and happened to have on hand) wire. You want to carefully thread the wire (or fishing line works, too) through some of the base leaves the plant and then twist (not too tight, just enough to be secure).

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

For the larger plants, you may need to slip a wire around the base, as well as another towards the top of the plant. They can be heavy.

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

The smaller plants are fine just having one wire threaded through the base.

Now place the plant where you’d like it, wrapping the wire around the backside of the wreath form and twisting to secure. I also like to put a dab of hot glue on this back twist (being VERY careful not to get any on the plant itself), just to give it a little extra hold. Try to attach your plants so that they hang horizontally, as this is how they would attach themselves in nature, and this will help prevent water from collecting in their armpits (where the leaves join the plant–I’m so scientific), which is not good for them. If you must attach them so they sit upright (which a few of mine are), you may need to lay the wreath flat when you mist  or rinse the plants (this is how you should water them).

Add plants to your heart’s content! When you are happy with the arrangement, tuck some bits of moss in and around, securing with a bit of hot glue when necessary (again, being SO careful not to get it on the tillandsias).

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

Honestly? This looks pretty dang good. I almost stopped here. Almost.

For some reason, I had it in my head that I wanted a couple of tiny floating air plants in this thing. So I selected some small specimens, threaded them with wire, and then attached them to the top of the wreath (twisting and securing with hot glue there). I then applied bits of sheet moss at random to the rest of the naked wreath using plenty of hot glue (also covering the spot where the hanging plants’ wires attached to the top of the wreath).

DIY Tillandsia Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

Ta-dah!!!

Hang your wreath in a protected area with bright, indirect sunlight, and be sure to water regularly by misting or running under water, depending on climate and plant type. For a great article on how to care for your tillandsias, check out this post on FloraGrubb.com.

The Nest Reno

A Visit to The Nest Reno from Farmhouse38While visiting Reno a couple of weekends ago, Laura, of Olive and Love, took me to one of her favorite vintage shops, The Nest Reno, for their annual Terrarium Class (which was more of a party)–ummm, vintage clothes, furniture, decor, and DIY miniature greenhouses? This is my kind of Valentine’s Day!

A Visit to The Nest Reno from Farmhouse38

The class took place inside this adorable urban vintage boutique (The Nest), with terrarium-making goods provided by Sierra Water Gardens.

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

As you can see, the store was jam-packed for this event!

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

Eclectic glass containers were provided by The Nest, and we had all sorts of fun materials to build our terrariums with. Including wine. And dessert. Essential to terrarium-building.

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

The air plants provided by Sierra Water Gardens were to die for!

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

I was so obsessed with the air plants that that was all I used in my terrarium.

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

Mr. OliveandLove made a pretty darn great terrarium. Raar! Lol.

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

But I think Mrs. OliveandLove takes the grand prize for her adorable tiny garden.

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

Her scrabble tiles read: Here. How many points is that?!

When we finished our little projects, we finally got to wander and mingle in the store and see all the amazing stuff that Tessa, owner of The Nest, has curated. Eye candy everywhere you look in this place!

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

Gorgeous vintage ties.

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

It’s bananas how much I love these old bottles.

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

Floral couch love.

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

There were so many adorable pieces of furniture (I promise you I walked out with several–paid for, I swear-you’ll see more about that in a later post).

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

Laura does some hat modeling on the side. She doesn’t like to brag about it.

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

We had too much fun. And maybe a lot of wine.

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.comA Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.comA Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.comA Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

A Visit to The Nest Reno by Farmhouse38.com

I may have bought a few extra air plants while I was at it.

We really had a fabulous time, and I just love this store. If you are ever in Reno, drop in and say hi!

In the meantime, be sure to follow along with The Nest Reno on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, to see what’s new at the store.

Also–take a look at Sierra Water Gardens and follow along with their green-thumbed adventures on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Thanks to all of you wonderful ladies for such a fun time! I heart Reno!

Coffee Filter Peonies

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.comCoffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Making flowers out of coffee filters or tissue is nothing new, but I’ve been meaning to try my hand at it for quite sometime. And when I say ‘try my hand’, I mean ‘try my hand’:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Wear gloves. Learn from my mistakes.

Of all the hundreds of tutorials out there on this, I landed on the one from Rebecca at The Crafted Sparrow. I liked this one. So I did it. 🙂 Honestly, she does a really bang-up job of laying out the tutorial, so I highly recommend you head over and follow her instructions–but I will muddle through mine just the same! Because I am a professional muddler.

I began with pretty simple supplies: scissors, large white coffee filters, thin craft wire, floral tape, hot glue, and whatever color food coloring you are looking to do. I wanted RED. Super-saturated red. We’ll get to that later.

Supplies for making Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Simple enough!

Now settle in for some busywork…depending on how many flowers you want to make, there is quite a bit of coffee-filter cutting to be done. I obviously wanted a lot of flowers, so I kind of hunkered down a few nights in a row and cut filters while watching a lot of reality TV. It helps. I promise.

You’ll want to fold a single coffee filter in half, then in fourths, then again into eighths and cut the top of it into an arch (in order to make a scalloped edge). I even folded some to just fourths, and some as much as into sixteenths, because I wanted the ruffles of the flowers to be inconsistent (which feels more real to me).

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

For the center of every flower, I wanted some fringe, so I folded the coffee filters into eighths and then instead of just scalloping the top, I actually cut them down in length by about a quarter, and scalloped the edge. Then I cut the edge so that it had fringe.

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Magic! I suddenly have a manicure.

A typical flower is going to be assembled from various pieces of these different-shaped filters–you can use any combination or repetition of any of the scalloped-edged pieces, with one fringe piece in the center.

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

A typical blossom is made up of about four pieces, but to make larger ones, sometimes I would use up to six, and to make smaller ones, sometimes I would only use one scalloped-edge piece and one center piece. There is no right or wrong amount here, and I strongly encourage you to make them various sizes–much more realistic-looking that way!

Now, take a small length of wire for your stem. Rebecca at The Crafted Sparrow suggested taking a pencil or a paintbrush or something of the sort and wrapping one end of the wire around this a few times to make a small circle as a sort of catch for the wire to not pull all the way through the coffee filters. I did this. Great idea. So once you have your wire loop, slide a fringed coffee filter piece on up the wire and mush it into a flower shape (again, look at the Rebecca’s tutorial, she did a better job of documenting this with the camera). I adhered it with a dot of hot glue. Then slide a scalloped coffee filter of your choosing up next. Mold it into a flower shape and adhere it with hot glue. Keep building until your flower makes you happy. If you want, at the end, you can wrap floral tape around the bottom to give it a finished look.

Now for the fun part…dyeing them! To get your desired color, you’re gonna have to mess around a little bit with your food coloring. Mix a few drops of food coloring with water in a bowl and test it out on your extra coffee filters. I wanted my flowers to be all varying shades of red, and so, to be honest, I hardly had any water mixed with mine at all–nearly straight food coloring. For some of them, I even added black food coloring to get that black-red color.

Coffee Filter Peonies from Farmhouse38.com

I recommend making several bowls full of varying shades of the same color, as this gives you a really realistic color scheme (flowers are gonna vary in color slightly from one to the next, right??). So play around with it! And…again…wear gloves.

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

I dipped my blooms fully into the mixture, making sure that every bit was soaked up with liquid. Then I set them, face down, on a tinfoil-lined cookie sheet to dry. Once dry, I went through and fluffed them up into the proper shape.

I went around and around with what I actually wanted to use these for–my intention was to make a Valentine’s Day centerpiece using up-cycled tin cans as vases. Long story short, I wasn’t super pleased with how it turned out:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Not the worst thing I’ve ever made, so I figured I’d share the photos anyways. Happy Valentine’s Day a week late!! LOL.

It was at this point that I realized what I really wanted out of these things was a big, lush centerpiece arrangement. So I dug out my big silver basin, and taped the top off into a grid (this is a great florist’s trick that helps support a mass of flowers-live or paper- in a wide-mouthed vessel. I used Scotch tape, which works fine, but clear floral tape works even better if you can get it because it is narrower, clearer, and has a stronger bond).

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Make sure your vessel is completely dry when you apply the tape. I dried it off, but just before I took this photo, my sparkling water bottle exploded everywhere. Perfect.

Be sure to run a length of tape around the circumference of the vessel to pin down the grid tape edges:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

It ain’t too purty but it keeps things secure and theoretically will be covered by the lushness of your arrangement.

I started by inserting a bunch of branches:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Next, I realized that the flimsy wire I made my peonies with was too flimsy, so I hot-glued each blossom to a piece of stiff, raffia-covered craft wire. Then I proceeded to shove them in amongst the branches.

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Once you’ve got quite a few flowers in there, add a few more branches, and then keep adding flowers until the thing is overflowing.

I even hot-glued a couple of smaller blossoms to some of the branches for a little more drama:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.comCoffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

So as much as this was supposed to be a Valentine’s Day project, I bumbled it enough that it didn’t quite turn out to be that. But that’s just between you and me.

Happy Valentine’s Day next year!!!

Stalking OliveandLove.com

Farmhouse38.com Visits OliveandLove.com

Look at that view. Now imagine it from nearly every room of your amazingly creative, light-filled, love-filled home. That’s just how life is at OliveandLove.com. I’m such a lucky ducky for getting to go visit, and Laura and Dan are probably regretting their hospitality because I’m already planning my next trip. And the one after that.

You might have seen me gush over Laura’s incredible dining room shutter wall. You may have also seen Country Living Magazine do the same in their April 2012 issue (see the online version here). Well, I was pretty geeked out over seeing it in person for the first time…so I took a lot of photos…and when I say ‘a lot’ I mean ‘A LOT’. I regret nothing.

Shutterwall at OliveandLove.com via Farmhouse38

Their entry hall peeks into the dining room with all it’s shuttered loveliness.

Here’s a better shot swiped from Oliveandlove.com:

Entryway at Oliveandlove.com

Oh, the fabulousness of that shutterwall glimpsed through re-purposed windows!

The Shutterwall at OliveandLove.com via Farmhouse38

There is such beautiful light in this room–and I absolutely heart the color scheme Laura chose to paint these pretties. It would have been really ‘safe’ to paint them white. Safe is for sissies.

How about a few more shots just because I am obsessed?

The Shutterwall at Oliveandlove.com via Farmhouse38.com

Gorgeous.

The Shutterwall at Oliveandlove.com via Farmhouse38

More gorgeous.

Though The Shutterwall grabs you immediately as you enter, it is only the tip of the iceberg; the whole house is so fantastically curated that I could literally photograph every little nook and cranny and they would all look like magazine vignettes. No joke. Across the entry from the dining room is an equally light-filled room that is Laura’s lovely studio (did I mention she’s also a prolific artist? No? Well, she is also a prolific artist–see some of her work here).

The Studio at Oliveandlove.com via Farmhouse38.com

Where the creative magic happens.

Laura is kind of a freak genius when it comes to thrift store and flea market hunting. She’s got a special sort of spidey-sense that leads her to the most incredible finds.  One of my favorites resides in the studio:

Vintage Finds from Oliveandlove.com

I mean. Come on. Magnificent. A vintage card catalog, all filled with perfectly organized little crafting bits and bobs.

Right around the corner from the studio is another fun up-cycled masterpiece: the chair shelves. Or shelve chairs. Call them what you will.

Upcycled Chair Shelves from Oliveandlove.com via Farmhouse38

I mean, who thinks of these things?!! Laura. Laura thinks of these things.

The Livingroom at Oliveandlove.com

The entry opens onto the livingroom, which is layered with light and color and texture, creative collections, and Laura’s original art. AND it looks out onto that incredible view of the mountains.

Some other Olive and Love moments:

Vintage Finds at Oliveandlove.com

Vintage WWII posters. Awesome.

Guinea pigs at Oliveandlove.com via Farmhouse38

Guinea pig cuddles.

Hand-painted Rooster by Oliveandlove.com via Farmhouse38.com

My hand-painted birthday gift from Laura. A rooster with some gangsta swag.

A funny from oliveandlove.com via farmhouse38.com

The Olive-and-Love-Mobile. A minivan. LOL.

Little Moments from my OliveandLove.com house tour. Farmhouse38.com

Emma, soaking up some warm sun.

Planked Wood Floors at Oliveandlove.com via Farmhouse38.com

I love these planked floors. I want them in my house.

A visit to Oliveandlove.com via Farmhouse38

My older brother got to drop in for a quick visit, too, and there was some very serious Sunday morning chess to be played with the Olive and Love crew.

House Tour of OliveandLove.com via Farmhouse38.com

Another shot of those fantastic chartreuse Adirondacks looking out at that view. *sigh*

A house tour of oliveandlove.com via farmhouse38.com

A little Valentine’s Day on a DIY message board.

House tour at Oliveandlove.com via Farmhouse38

A kitty-cat vignette.

The kitchen at Olive and Love headquarters is another favorite spot of mine:

The Kitchen at Oliveandlove.com

Lots of adorable vintage finds in this room…and check out the quirk of those awesome pendants. Those are upside-down table lamps, people. Love it.

I want to go on. Because every room in this sprawling house deserves a mention. But head on over to the official house tour at OliveandLove.com to see the rest. Be sure you check out the master bedroom and bath. And also the kids’ rooms. And the guest room where I stayed. Oh just go look at all of it. It’s all amazeballs.

The reason for my trip was, contrary to popular belief, not to sit and stare gape-mouthed at the Olive and Love house (even though a large portion of my time there was spent doing just exactly that). My birthday was a couple of weeks back, and The Texan bought me the ticket (no, it was not one way) as a gift so I could go have a fun weekend with friends. He works so much this time of year that we never really get to do anything fun for our birthdays (his is a week or so before mine) or for Valentine’s Day. So this year, I spent Valentine’s Day weekend exploring Reno (where I had never before been) with Laura. We filled our days with a little bit of snowshoeing, a ton of shopping (that thrifty spidey-sense of her’s really came in handy), and a lot of sight-seeing. Such fun!

Snowshoeing In Reno with Oliveandlove.com via Farmhouse38.com

Laura and I taking in some fresh alpine air. It burns (when you’re used to breathing smog).

Oliveandlove.com and Farmhouse38.com getting into trouble.

Goofing off at The Nest Reno during their Valentine’s Day Terrarium Class (more on that fun time coming soon).

Reno weekend with oliveandlove.com via farmhouse38.com

I’m such a sucker for sparkly lights.

Thanks for a great time, Oliveandlove.com! And thanks for indefinitely storing all that stuff I bought that was too big to come home on the plane. I will settle my storage bill when I come back up in a few weeks. 🙂

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs (and a Bee Sting)

DIY Flower Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Today’s looking up for Phoebe.  Yesterday wasn’t so fun:

Bee Stung Puppyface from Farmhouse38.com

This is what it looks like when you take a bee stinger to the mouth.

Bee stung puppyface from Farmhouse38.com

Needless to say, poor puppyface was in a lot of pain, and had to go to the vet for a shot. Sad face.

But today, her face has returned to it’s normal level of goofy, and she is feeling quite fantastic. So we decided to celebrate with a puppy flower collar.

DIY Flower Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Who’s a pretty girl?!

This tutorial harkens back to my floral design days when we’d do floral collars for dogs who got to be in the wedding party (which is pretty much my favorite thing ever). They’re so simple to make, and as long as you have a tolerant dog, they’re pretty easy to wear (I should note here that not all dogs will be a fan of this, so proceed with caution.  Also, be sure to select flowers that are non-toxic–I cannot stress this enough. Roses, marigolds, daisies, snapdragons, small sunflowers, coneflowers, etc. are all choices that are non-toxic and also hold up well in this sort of application-ie, won’t get too floppy too soon. Also herbs–herbs are great for this).

Start off by measuring your pet’s neck, and then add about two inches to that measurement. Now cut that amount of thin craft wire, and twist a small loop at one end:

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Select your flowers and cut them right at the top of the stem so that the blossom has zero stem.

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

No stem!!

Now, carefully poke the wire through the base of the bud and out the other side. Sometimes it’s helpful to use a pin to sort of ‘pre-drill’ through the flower before poking the wire through.

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

DIY Floral Collar from Farmhouse38.com

Slide that wire on through.

Slide the blossom on down, and repeat until you have filled the length with about an inch to spare.

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Now, place the collar on your victim and feed the loose wire end through the looped wire end and secure.

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Oh, Phoebe…workin’ that collar!

I should also note that an optional and very pretty way to attach the collar is to start with a slightly shorter wire length, put a wire loop at each end of the wire, and then attach short lengths of ribbon to each end.  These can then easily be tied together to secure around your pet’s neck:

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Willie shows off this version.

This was, incidentally, the method I used to make Millie’s pretty little necklace last spring (some of you might remember):

DIY Floral Collars from Farmhouse38.com

I should note here that Miss Millie was not a fan of her necklace AT ALL. I do not recommend putting accessories on your chickens unless they are just really used to these sorts of shenanigans or are really just that fashionable.

But the Feebster didn’t seem to mind her collar too much. She knows it goes well with her non-swollen face.

DIY Floral Collars for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Cupid’s Arrow Heart Wreath

Cupid's Arrow Heart Wreath from Farmhouse38.comI’ve still got a few more Valentine’s Day projects and goodies to try to squeeze in before it’s here! This one is a natural companion for the Cupid’s Arrow Garland. Same little arrows (see how to make them here), all clustered together on a DIY wire heart wreath.

Once you’ve taken a look at the other post and learned how to make the arrows, all you need is some raffia-covered wire from the floral section at the craft store, and a hot glue gun.

I cut three lengths of the raffia wire, approximately 70 inches in length (the finished wreath is about 18 x 18″). I then twisted these three pieces into one. At the middle of the length of twisted wire, make a bend, this will be the point of the heart. Now neatly twist together the loose ends and proceed to shape the wire into a heart form.

DIY Cupid's Arrow Heart Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

My crafting sidekick observes.

DIY Cupid's Arrow Heart Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

Make sure you double-check that the ends are secure.

DIY Cupid's Arrow Heart Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

If need be, bring in a second pair of eyes to make sure your ends are secure.

Now, glue your arrows into place. It’s as simple as that (once you’ve handmade about forty arrows–no biggie!).

DIY Cupid's Arrow Heart Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

And there you have it!

If this wreath is going outside, hit the whole thing with a good coat of poly just to help ensure it holds up.

That is all for now-carry on!

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