Category Archives: The Farmhouse Menagerie

Happy St. Paddy’s!

StPaddys2015wmIt’s not easy being green.

Happy, Happy, Happy!

Happy New Year from Farmhouse38.com

My poor dogs.

But…yanno…Happy New Year!!!

Happy New Year from Farmhouse38.com

If looks could kill…

 

Happy New Year from Farmhouse38.com

Puppy loves.

Wishing you all a happy, healthy 2015!

Thing 1 & Thing 2

Thing 1 and Thing 2 Dog Halloween Costumes from Farmhouse38.com

A day late, but there’s still time for a Halloween chuckle: this is what the dogs put up with this year.

And the white dog’s expression in this photo about sums it all up:

Thing 1 and Thing 2 dog Halloween costumes from Farmhouse38.comHope you all had a happy Halloween!

 

Phoebe’s 1st Birthday

Phoebe's 1st Birthday at Farmhouse38.com

I cannot believe this little lunatic is a year old! And in true Farmhouse38 fashion, we couldn’t let this moment slip by without a little party. So Phoebe donned her finest tutu and tiara, and I whipped up a really simple and adorable layered pupcake. And before anyone freaks out, the flame on the candle in the above photo is photoshopped in…a tutu on a tasmanian devil next to an open flame: how’s about NOPE.

Phoebe's 1st Birthday at Farmhouse38.com

I do have to say: for a tasmanian devil in a tutu and tiara with a tantalizing snack right in front of her nose…she was so super patient and obedient while I took hundreds of photos.

After a successful photo shoot, it was time for cake:

Phoebe's 1st Birthday at Farmhouse38.com

Ingredients:

-1 can of wet dog food of your choice that keeps its ‘can’ shape (I use Blue Buffalo brand and it really doesn’t keep its shape too well, so you gotta sorta improvise)

-3 slices of whole grain organic wheat bread

-Approx. half cup of organic, no salt creamy peanut butter

-a thin sheet of cardboard or cardstock

-some cute, heart-shaped training treats or kibble as decoration

This cake was super simple to make. I started with a can of wet dog food: the gross, meatloaf-y kind that sorta keeps it’s shape when you shake it out of the can. Before I removed said gross dog food from the can, I actually used it to trace a circle on a thin sheet of cardboard (I stole a piece from the back of a notepad…none of my notepads have cardboard backing anymore-I always steal them for random projects like these). Cut out this circle and build your cake on it–this makes it easier to slip a spatula under it and move the cake around when you are done (you know…in case you are doing a long, drawn-out photo shoot with it).

Open your dog food and shake it out onto a plate so that it preserves its ‘can’ shape (Thanksgiving cranberry dressing-style). If it doesn’t keep its can shape, you can still kind of cut a piece and smush it together. Now use the opening of the can as a cookie-cutter to cut three crustless circles of bread.

Place your first bread circle directly on top of the cardboard piece and center. Now, using a sharp knife, carefully cut a slice of wet dog food (I cut mine approx. a half inch thick) and gently set it on top of the first bread circle. Follow that with another bread circle and press the layers together gently. Add another layer of dog food and top with the final piece of bread. Again, press all the layers gently together.

Now, ‘ice’ your cake with the peanut butter. It may help to heat the peanut butter to a consistency that allows you to easily spread it without mauling the cake structure. Once you have it iced, top it with a few kibble or treat ‘sprinkles’.

Phoebe's 1st Birthday at Farmhouse38.com

This actually cuts very nicely into cake slices.

Phoebe's 1st Birthday at Farmhouse38.com

Brown dog and white dog wait patiently for their cake.

Phoebe's 1st Birthday at Farmhouse38.com

Those slices didn’t stand a chance.

Each of my dogs was only allowed one slice of cake–I think it goes without saying that this is a once-in-a-blue-moon treat and not something they should be fed frequently (and I don’t recommend that anyone feed this whole cake to one dog). Bread isn’t that good for dogs. In small doses, it can actually be a good source of fiber–but please don’t make it a habit to feed your dogs this on a regular basis. Most bread has added sugar and salt and all sorts of stuff that is just not good for doggie tummies. Raw, unsalted peanut butter is considered by most to be a healthy treat, but also proceed with caution. Just like people, some dogs can be deathly allergic to it. But…ya know…sometimes even doggies gotta treat yoself!

Phoebe's 1st Birthday at Farmhouse38.com

Happy, happy birthday to this silliest little girl. Never a dull moment.

 

Meet the Peeps

Meet the Peeps of Farmhouse38.com

I realized that with the timing of the arrival of these three, they got a little over-shadowed by Easter and all associated busy-ness and festivities. I feel like I didn’t give them a proper welcome. And that’s not how we roll.

Afterall, these babies were a long-time planned and waited-for. We live on a small (7500 sq ft!), suburban lot, and we already have our three grown hens, so I agonized for quite awhile over whether adding more was the right thing to do. But, at the end of the day, we just weren’t getting quite enough eggs, and we felt like six hens would be perfect (and be the absolute maximum that was even remotely sane for us to have on this property). Here’s hoping (crossing fingers and toes while knocking on wood) for all hens, because we can’t keep roosters here. Here’s also hoping for a couple of blue or green egg-layers!

So…without further ado:

New Peeps at Farmhouse38.com

Annabel Lee, an Easter Egger, named by one of my favorite kids (shout-out to C1!) for the title character of Edgar Allen Poe’s iconic poem.

New Peeps at Farmhouse38.com

Veruca Salt, hereafter known as ‘Salt’, is a Lavender Orpington named for a certain notorious Willie Wonka character. Let’s hope she doesn’t live up to her namesake!

New Peeps at Farmhouse38.com

Beatrix Potter, another little Easter Egger, has proven very difficult to snap a good photo of! (Please refer to the Easter post for reference). You’re looking at the only one. Shy baby!

I would be remiss if I didn’t give out a shout-out to Dare 2 Dream Farms for these pretty babies. This is a gorgeous farm located about 3 hours north of Los Angeles in the Santa Barbara wine country. You just must take a look (follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!) and see their beautiful farm, upcoming CSA, as well as, all their stunning, lovingly-raised chicken breeds.

New Peeps at Farmhouse38.com

New Peeps at Farmhouse38.com

New Peeps at Farmhouse38.com

And now…what you have all been waiting for…I give you…The Peeps Show!

 

 

A Monarch Chrysalis

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38For everyone interested in seeing the photo progression of the monarch chrysalis…this post is for you!

Of course, a few weeks back, my milkweed plants were teaming with monarch larvae:

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38.com

Eventually, they got big and fat:

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38.com

 

And then they proceeded to trek away from the milkweed to find a place to pupate (build their chrysalis). We found them cruising in the very far reaches of our yard. Incredible.

But I was especially astounded when I went to give my Lady Scarecrow a spring makeover (her clothes are so Spring 2013), and as I was stripping her down, I found this!:

Monarch Butterflies at Farmhouse38.com

It was attached right to her wrist, like a little charm. Of course, I carefully readjusted her clothes and left everything just as it was.

So thrilling!

I proceeded to check on it everyday. For about a week, it looked just the same, and then suddenly, one day, it looked like this:

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38.com

 

I knew it must be close, so I started checking on it about once an hour, like a maniac. When it didn’t hatch that day, I knew that probably as soon as it was warm the next morning, the game was on.

The next morning, it looked very similar, but those pretty golden accents had all but disappeared, and the shell of the chrysalis was so very transparent, it was crazy!

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38.com

Once it began to warm outside, we began to check on it at five minute intervals.

And lo and behold, we missed it emerging! 😦

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38.com

Within a five minute span, it had hatched, and pumped its crumpled wings full of fluid.

I was so upset that I missed it, that I swore I was going to sit there and watch it until it took its first flight. So I sat and watched.

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38.com

Slowly it flexed its wings and legs, and made its way up from the chrysalis and into the sun.

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38.com

I waited.

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38.com

And I waited.

A Monarch Chrysalis from Farmhouse38.com

And the white dog waited.

Until finally…it really began to stretch its wings in the sunshine.

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38.com

At this point, I was finally able to tell that this was a male (by the two black spots in the center of each lower wing).

They say that it takes about an hour before a monarch is ready to take flight, but the white dog and I waited two and a half hours for this little guy.

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38.com

I could see him start to vibrate and really pump his wings, and I knew it was the moment.

And then–just like that–he was off!

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38.com

A bit out of focus, but there he went–tumbling clumsily around.

And then we were super tired so we had to rest on a nearby rose bush:

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38.com

First flights are exhausting.

After a bit of a rest, he flitted to a few different resting spots in the yard, and then he was off, tumbling and flying with the other monarchs that had been playing in the garden that day.

Magic. Complete and utter magic.

A Monarch Chrysalis at Farmhouse38.com

The white dog just really wasn’t all that impressed.

 

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs (and a Bee Sting)

DIY Flower Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Today’s looking up for Phoebe.  Yesterday wasn’t so fun:

Bee Stung Puppyface from Farmhouse38.com

This is what it looks like when you take a bee stinger to the mouth.

Bee stung puppyface from Farmhouse38.com

Needless to say, poor puppyface was in a lot of pain, and had to go to the vet for a shot. Sad face.

But today, her face has returned to it’s normal level of goofy, and she is feeling quite fantastic. So we decided to celebrate with a puppy flower collar.

DIY Flower Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Who’s a pretty girl?!

This tutorial harkens back to my floral design days when we’d do floral collars for dogs who got to be in the wedding party (which is pretty much my favorite thing ever). They’re so simple to make, and as long as you have a tolerant dog, they’re pretty easy to wear (I should note here that not all dogs will be a fan of this, so proceed with caution.  Also, be sure to select flowers that are non-toxic–I cannot stress this enough. Roses, marigolds, daisies, snapdragons, small sunflowers, coneflowers, etc. are all choices that are non-toxic and also hold up well in this sort of application-ie, won’t get too floppy too soon. Also herbs–herbs are great for this).

Start off by measuring your pet’s neck, and then add about two inches to that measurement. Now cut that amount of thin craft wire, and twist a small loop at one end:

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Select your flowers and cut them right at the top of the stem so that the blossom has zero stem.

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

No stem!!

Now, carefully poke the wire through the base of the bud and out the other side. Sometimes it’s helpful to use a pin to sort of ‘pre-drill’ through the flower before poking the wire through.

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

DIY Floral Collar from Farmhouse38.com

Slide that wire on through.

Slide the blossom on down, and repeat until you have filled the length with about an inch to spare.

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Now, place the collar on your victim and feed the loose wire end through the looped wire end and secure.

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Oh, Phoebe…workin’ that collar!

I should also note that an optional and very pretty way to attach the collar is to start with a slightly shorter wire length, put a wire loop at each end of the wire, and then attach short lengths of ribbon to each end.  These can then easily be tied together to secure around your pet’s neck:

DIY Floral Collar for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

Willie shows off this version.

This was, incidentally, the method I used to make Millie’s pretty little necklace last spring (some of you might remember):

DIY Floral Collars from Farmhouse38.com

I should note here that Miss Millie was not a fan of her necklace AT ALL. I do not recommend putting accessories on your chickens unless they are just really used to these sorts of shenanigans or are really just that fashionable.

But the Feebster didn’t seem to mind her collar too much. She knows it goes well with her non-swollen face.

DIY Floral Collars for Dogs from Farmhouse38.com

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