Tag Archives: Valentine’s Day

A Valentine for Succulent Lovers

A Valentine for Succulent Lovers from Farmhouse38.com.I love cheesy Valentine’s Day heart-shaped candy boxes. I really, really do. It’s not even about the candy (I swear. No, that is not chocolate on my face. It’s probably chicken poop, can we continue?). I just love the, shall we call it: Hallmark-Chic, of it all. Haters gonna hate.

So clearly, I adore upcycling these things (see Valentine’s Candy Box Roses). And, since I have a whole slew of propagated succulent babies waiting to be transplanted, here goes nothing!

Using an upcycled heart-shaped candy box for a Valentine's Day craft, from farmhouse38.com

I especially love this box from Whitman’s–it’s tin, with a plastic candy tray, which makes it perfect for using as a decorative succulent planter!

Once you are done demolishing the candy, remove the plastic candy tray from the box. Poke a couple of small holes in the bottom of each little candy well (do this if you plan to leave the succulents planted in there for awhile–if you are just doing this for presentation and a quick replant, then don’t bother), place a real thin layer of aquarium gravel or some other fine gravel in the bottom of each candy well, and then fill each well with cactus/succulent potting mix.

Turning a Valentine's heart-shaped candy box into a succulent planter, from Farmhouse38.com

Meanwhile, take your tin box and paint it however you like. I started with a good coat of white spray primer, let it dry, and then painted the top mint green. I wanted the bottom to be sparkly gold, so I then did a coat of gold spray paint. After this dried, I sprayed a thick layer of gold-sparkle spray paint and then immediately coated in gold glitter. When that had dried, I knocked off the loose glitter and coated the whole thing in another coat of glitter spray paint to ‘seal’ it. If you don’t have glitter spray paint, you can use ModgePodge or Elmer’s to adhere the gold glitter, and once it has dried, seal it with a spray paint clear coat.

Upcycling a Valentine's Day heart-shaped candy box into a succulent planter from Farmhouse38.com

To finish the lid of the box, I wanted to do a tailored, traditional bow and ribbon, kind of like what you might find on just this sort of box of candy (this is important because you gotta put something fancy on there to cover the “Whitman’s” embossed label. Sorry Whitman’s, it’s been real). I started by cutting a length of coral grosgrain ribbon to fit diagonally across the lid, and then hot-glued it into place. I did the same with an overlay of sparkly gold ribbon.

Upcycling a Valentine's heart-shaped candy box into a succulent planter by farmhouse38.com

 

Now, make your bow and adhere it. (Since I forgot to photograph this, please refer to this sloppily drawn instructional cartoon).

How to make a tuxedo bow from Farmhouse38.com

Upcycling a Valentine's Day heart-shaped candy box into a succulent planter from Farmhouse38.comSucculent planting time!

If you don’t have itty bitty propagated succulent bits laying around like I do, hopefully you can find some tiny potted succulents to buy somewhere. Or maybe you have mature succulents that you can take cuttings from (here is a great how-to on propagating succulents).

Propagating succulents and upcycling a Valentine's heart-shaped candy box into a succulent planter from Farmhouse38.comNow carefully plant your little baby plants in the individual candy wells. If you want to be able to place the lid on the box, you must be mindful of the finished height of the planted succulents. Succulents don’t like being squashed.

Upcycled Valentine's Day heart-shaped candy box turned succulent planter from Farmhouse38.com

Upcycling a Valentine's Day heart-shaped candy box into a succulent planter by Farmhouse38.com

I heart succulents. Upcycling a Valentine's Day heart-shaped candy box into a succulent planter by Farmhouse38.com

 

I heart succulents. Can you tell?

 

 

 

Valentine’s Day Craftiness Round-Up

It’s almost Valentine’s Day, guys! So it just feels right to do a little rodeo round-up of my previous Valentine’s Day projects–put them all in one easy spot for your viewing pleasure:

Cupid's Arrow Heart Wreath from Farmhouse38.com

I have a thing for heart-tipped arrows. You’ll see. Learn how to make this wreath here.

DIY painted rocks from Farmhouse38.com

A couple of rocks, a little paint, a little glitter…adorable porch decor (or bookends, or door stops). See how to make these and more painted rocks here.

Valentine's Candy Box Roses from Farmhouse38.com

I’m all about the flowers. Here’s a fun spin on the traditional red rose bouquet, using an up-cycled heart-shaped candy box. For the full tutorial, click here.

Cupid's Arrow Garland from Farmhouse38.com

To go along with the Cupid’s Arrow Wreath, how about a pretty little garland? Here‘s the tutorial.

Primitive Egg Wreath DIY from Farmhouse38.com

This was an Easter project, but because it’s got a little red heart on it, it makes the Valentine’s Day cut. I do what I want. See the tutorial here.

DIY Coffee Filter Peonies from Farmhouse38.com

Everlasting peonies! Oh, these are so fun to make! And if you really super-saturate those colors, they look darned near real. Learn how here.

DIY Primitive Heart Wreath by farmhouse38.com

I adore the simplicity of primitive wreaths. How’s about one for V-day? Here you go.

DIY cupid's arrow doormat from Farmhouse38.com

I love, love, love making my own doormats. They could not be easier. Well, they could be easier, but for the sake of this post, let’s just not split hairs. See the full tutorial here.

Sour Cherry Margaritas from Farmhouse38.com

And just in case craft hour happens to coincide with cocktail hour…a Valentinesy margarita recipe to get your creative process going. I’m just looking out for you guys.

Coffee Filter Peonies

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.comCoffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Making flowers out of coffee filters or tissue is nothing new, but I’ve been meaning to try my hand at it for quite sometime. And when I say ‘try my hand’, I mean ‘try my hand’:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Wear gloves. Learn from my mistakes.

Of all the hundreds of tutorials out there on this, I landed on the one from Rebecca at The Crafted Sparrow. I liked this one. So I did it. 🙂 Honestly, she does a really bang-up job of laying out the tutorial, so I highly recommend you head over and follow her instructions–but I will muddle through mine just the same! Because I am a professional muddler.

I began with pretty simple supplies: scissors, large white coffee filters, thin craft wire, floral tape, hot glue, and whatever color food coloring you are looking to do. I wanted RED. Super-saturated red. We’ll get to that later.

Supplies for making Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Simple enough!

Now settle in for some busywork…depending on how many flowers you want to make, there is quite a bit of coffee-filter cutting to be done. I obviously wanted a lot of flowers, so I kind of hunkered down a few nights in a row and cut filters while watching a lot of reality TV. It helps. I promise.

You’ll want to fold a single coffee filter in half, then in fourths, then again into eighths and cut the top of it into an arch (in order to make a scalloped edge). I even folded some to just fourths, and some as much as into sixteenths, because I wanted the ruffles of the flowers to be inconsistent (which feels more real to me).

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

For the center of every flower, I wanted some fringe, so I folded the coffee filters into eighths and then instead of just scalloping the top, I actually cut them down in length by about a quarter, and scalloped the edge. Then I cut the edge so that it had fringe.

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Magic! I suddenly have a manicure.

A typical flower is going to be assembled from various pieces of these different-shaped filters–you can use any combination or repetition of any of the scalloped-edged pieces, with one fringe piece in the center.

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

A typical blossom is made up of about four pieces, but to make larger ones, sometimes I would use up to six, and to make smaller ones, sometimes I would only use one scalloped-edge piece and one center piece. There is no right or wrong amount here, and I strongly encourage you to make them various sizes–much more realistic-looking that way!

Now, take a small length of wire for your stem. Rebecca at The Crafted Sparrow suggested taking a pencil or a paintbrush or something of the sort and wrapping one end of the wire around this a few times to make a small circle as a sort of catch for the wire to not pull all the way through the coffee filters. I did this. Great idea. So once you have your wire loop, slide a fringed coffee filter piece on up the wire and mush it into a flower shape (again, look at the Rebecca’s tutorial, she did a better job of documenting this with the camera). I adhered it with a dot of hot glue. Then slide a scalloped coffee filter of your choosing up next. Mold it into a flower shape and adhere it with hot glue. Keep building until your flower makes you happy. If you want, at the end, you can wrap floral tape around the bottom to give it a finished look.

Now for the fun part…dyeing them! To get your desired color, you’re gonna have to mess around a little bit with your food coloring. Mix a few drops of food coloring with water in a bowl and test it out on your extra coffee filters. I wanted my flowers to be all varying shades of red, and so, to be honest, I hardly had any water mixed with mine at all–nearly straight food coloring. For some of them, I even added black food coloring to get that black-red color.

Coffee Filter Peonies from Farmhouse38.com

I recommend making several bowls full of varying shades of the same color, as this gives you a really realistic color scheme (flowers are gonna vary in color slightly from one to the next, right??). So play around with it! And…again…wear gloves.

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

I dipped my blooms fully into the mixture, making sure that every bit was soaked up with liquid. Then I set them, face down, on a tinfoil-lined cookie sheet to dry. Once dry, I went through and fluffed them up into the proper shape.

I went around and around with what I actually wanted to use these for–my intention was to make a Valentine’s Day centerpiece using up-cycled tin cans as vases. Long story short, I wasn’t super pleased with how it turned out:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Not the worst thing I’ve ever made, so I figured I’d share the photos anyways. Happy Valentine’s Day a week late!! LOL.

It was at this point that I realized what I really wanted out of these things was a big, lush centerpiece arrangement. So I dug out my big silver basin, and taped the top off into a grid (this is a great florist’s trick that helps support a mass of flowers-live or paper- in a wide-mouthed vessel. I used Scotch tape, which works fine, but clear floral tape works even better if you can get it because it is narrower, clearer, and has a stronger bond).

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Make sure your vessel is completely dry when you apply the tape. I dried it off, but just before I took this photo, my sparkling water bottle exploded everywhere. Perfect.

Be sure to run a length of tape around the circumference of the vessel to pin down the grid tape edges:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

It ain’t too purty but it keeps things secure and theoretically will be covered by the lushness of your arrangement.

I started by inserting a bunch of branches:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Next, I realized that the flimsy wire I made my peonies with was too flimsy, so I hot-glued each blossom to a piece of stiff, raffia-covered craft wire. Then I proceeded to shove them in amongst the branches.

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Once you’ve got quite a few flowers in there, add a few more branches, and then keep adding flowers until the thing is overflowing.

I even hot-glued a couple of smaller blossoms to some of the branches for a little more drama:

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

Coffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.comCoffee Filter Peonies by Farmhouse38.com

So as much as this was supposed to be a Valentine’s Day project, I bumbled it enough that it didn’t quite turn out to be that. But that’s just between you and me.

Happy Valentine’s Day next year!!!

Cupid’s Arrow Garland

DIY Cupid's Arrow Garland by Farmhouse38.comThe Valentine’s Day crafts have exploded glitter and little red and pink hearts all over the house. This is just the way it has to be.

This cute little garland is definitely largely to blame.

DIY Cupid's Arrow Garland by Farmhouse38.com

Teeny, tiny arrows…but what happened to the teeny, tiny bows? We may never know.

So I started by collecting a bunch of twigs from my cedar trees in the backyard.  I chose sticks that were roughly an eighth of an inch in diameter, more or less.  When I had found enough of these, I washed them (sticks are DIRTY, it turns out), and then cut them down into 2-1/2 to 3 inch lengths.  I cut approximately 45 little pieces. And then I laid them out to dry and get a tan.

DIY Cupid's Arrow Garland by Farmhouse38.com

This looks super OCD. Because it is.

While they dried, I went to work making my little hearts.  Now, I know there are lots of crafty options for making these little guys easily(hole punches, scrapbooking bits and bobs), but I never do things the easy way, it seems.  And I just wanted to make these from stuff I had sitting around at home–so that meant I traced and cut out each little heart by hand.  Using a random notecard, I drew my first heart and cut it out to my liking, and then used that to trace 44 more.  A little labor intensive, yes.  But worth it because I didn’t have to drag my butt to the craft store.

DIY Cupid's Arrow Garland by Farmhouse38.com

This didn’t take that long to do. I swear.

After I had cut them all out, I spaced them out on a piece of tinfoil and slapped some red paint on them.

While those dried, I gave the tiny sticks each a rough coat of white paint–not quite a solid coat so that they had a white-washy kinda vibe to them.

DIY Cupid's Arrow Garland from Farmhouse38.com

Painting sticks is fun. I promise. You might want to wear gloves.

Next I needed feathers…where to get some feathers…?

DIY Cupid's Arrow Garland by Farmhouse38.com

Oh, of course! My gatherings from the Great Chicken Molt of 2013.

I then cut each feather down into a sort of chevron shape (each feather yielded me two little arrow tufts), and then laid them out on tinfoil and slathered varying hues of acrylic paint across them.  Again, it’s a lot easier to just go and buy colored feathers from the craft store, but what else was I going to do with all these darned chicken feathers? (Don’t worry, more crafts!)

DIY Cupid's Arrow Garland by Farmhouse38.com

Let these dry just a tad and then carefully peel them up from the tinfoil so that they don’t get super stuck. Or save yourself the trouble and go buy feathers from Hobby Lobby.

When that had set, it was time to assemble the arrows.  Hello, hot glue gun!  I simply hot-glued a heart and a feather to each little painted stick.

DIY Cupid's Arrow Garland by Farmhouse38.com

They looked so adorable all lined up on this Gershwin & Gertie chalkboard that I almost wanted to glue them down and call it a day. But I did not.

It was at this juncture that I decided my little arrows were in serious need of some glitter.  So I gave each heart another coat of paint and a healthy dusting of red glitter and then let them set.

To assemble the garland, I used thin, galvanized, craft wire, which I wrapped around the center of the first arrow shaft a few times (you can super-secure this by hitting the wrapped wire with a dot of hot glue, but I didn’t need to do that).  Approximately five or so inches down the wire, I did this with the next arrow, and so on.

DIY Cupid's Arrow Garland by Farmhouse38.com

The spacing and quantity of materials I used yielded me about 14 feet of festiveness.

DIY Cupid's Arrow Garland from Farmhouse38.com

Oh, I am just getting started on the Valentine’s Day fun…never you worry. 🙂

Cupid’s Arrow Doormat

Cupid's Arrow Doormat from Farmhouse38Cupid's Arrow Doormat

More Valentine’s crafty decor!

I’m a big fan of making my own doormats.  Plain coir mats like the one above are sold for around $10.00 at Home Depot, and with some transparent contact paper (also from the Depot) to make a sticky-stencil and a bit of left-over spray paint, this is a relatively easy, inexpensive, and versatile DIY project.

For this design, I decided about how big I wanted my arrow, and then created it in a design program and printed it off the computer.  It took two standard-sized pieces of paper, which I then taped together into one design.

Arrow Template

Lined Up

Now cut a piece of contact paper big enough to fit over the top of this, then tape it to the print-out, as well as your work surface so nothing slides around.  Use a sharpie to trace your arrow image onto the contact paper.

Tracing

BTW….this is a great method to create a stencil for other craft projects.

Now comes the first tricky part: using a small pair of scissors, cut the arrow cleanly out of the middle of the contact paper. The contact paper is gonna wanna roll up on you, but keep calm!  It feeds off of your frustration.

Cut-out

Now, for the second tricky part: CAREFULLY remove the backing to the contact paper and stick your image where you want it on the doormat.  Nothing wants to stick to that coir very much, so you’ll be able to shimmy it around to get it lined up just right.  Tape it into place with painter’s tape and then use contact paper and/or painters tape to cover the rest of the mat to protect it from over-spray.

Stencil

Now, you’re ready to paint!  Hit the image with spray paint in short bursts from directly above, as again, the contact paper just barely adheres to the coir and if you blast it from an angle, it will lift right on off of there and ruin the whole thing.  Hit it with one, good coat of paint.

Paint

Let it dry for a few minutes, remove the template, and then let the rug sit and dry for about an hour or so before you put it out for use.

Cupid's Arrow

Another simple version of this went to our side door:

The chickens are just fascinated by this red heart on their doormat.

The chickens are just fascinated by this little red heart on their napping-mat.

%d bloggers like this: